Rated 5 out of 5 stars

I love it! It is an indispensable add-on imho.

I liked NoScript but it became a bit to aggressive for my needs - no offence meant as it is great for some people, YesScript does suit my needs perfectly. If you surf the same sites and you know what you want to block (i.e. blocking certain scripts, animations etc on a social networking site that crash my browser) then it is as easy as 1-2-3, nice and lightweight too!

5 out of 5 stars + an extra star *

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

NoScript is not bad - it's just YesScript is way better than having neither one, but... Rated 3 out of 5 stars

@RYAN2779
You said:
"YesScript is so much better than NoScript, and so under appreciated. It makes NO SENSE to block all websites from using JavaScript and to have to manually allow each and every address. It got so bad with NoScript that almost every new website I visited, I was temporarily allowing scripts, which can be dangerous."

Some of us disagree - sure I still have to enable some scripts now and then and sometimes even disable them (one IT-blogsite was so heavily scripted that my 1,8Ghz processor was not up to it) but it's not that often and I never had to do too much of it. My biggest reason was not paranoia (I trust that Linux I use is hard enough to exploit badly if someone comes up with a way and that this and low share on desktops make pretty sure that script-kiddies have almost so little interest to spoil my day via XHTML+EcmaScript) even though I do very much like to secure my system where ever I can and exploits via websites have become known on all types of operating systems and browsers long before the thing we call JavaScript had evolved to what it is today (a dangerous tool - if used in exploit - as in powerful script language running in users browser)..

And you go overboard when you say that it was dangerous when you so often temporarily allowed scripts on whole site - well, I still say that mostly even simply keeping scripting on is quite safe - I know NoScript warns that it's dangerous and I can't argue as this is really matter of how we individually define what is danger and levels, etc. of it. What you used anyway was "temporarily allow", this YesScript - a good piece of work most certainly - just turns all on or all off.

So it's either "very dangerous" as you say or no scripts at all - at least with NoScript you can just set the plugin to something you would more likely prefer. NoScript->Options and first leaf, "General" and choose the very first (non-recommended if you are paranoid) option "Temporarily allow top-level sites by default" and of the three options defining what by is the site recognized I chose first: "Full address" - I was just testing, this mode was not for me but this way new sites are by default allowed to run scripts. Naturally if they use, for example, ad-scripts from other server and it has been (with good reason) banned then not all scripts on page naturally work - but you can choose not to ban sites lightly and you can unban them too.

For you NoScript set up like this could be a boosted up YesScript though. Sites allowed by default (but that is not written anywhere: temporarily allowed). Now you can "Revoke temporary permissions" (in noscript menu this is site-specific) and it is like in YesScript turning scripts off. Again select "Temporarily allow all this site" and you have turned scripts on again.
SO HOW IS THIS *BETTER*?
So far I only explained how NoScript can be made do just what YesScript - it might be not as pretty for that as one simple icon (I suppose it uses icon) but it's quite well designed. Also one day you bump into zdnet.com blog site of demons, you'd like to read but blocking all scripts will make the site fail and allowing them all will make it crowl. Riiiighhttt.... But you still have, always had, the option to block sites and allow previously denied sites hosting scripts - if we were living days when JavaScript was kept on the site it was used, rarely a document linked to use many different javascript files, in fact mostly provided simply inline within the html file NoScript would have almost nothing to offer over YesScript and only marginally small amount of people would bother with it.

But cross-site scripting is today and there are sites where you might want, you might *need* to block scripts to be able to use the site - yet stopping all scripts altogether will render some of these sites unusable too.

P.S. I am exaggarating but it's not untrue what I have murmured here ;) YesScript is a fine tool but what I wanted was to try prove wrong the bad image your words (I think) were giving to NoScript and point that, used correctly, it can be just as easy as YesScript but with twist for if you suddenly wan't site-specific script-blockings.

I think YesScript *is* great. But if I must compare I would say that YesScript is to NoScript what Lola is to FireBug :o I really think so.

More quote:
"The worst thing is it would only show part of the web page and sometimes hang on loading others. I only need it to block scripts on a few websites, not the entire Internet. The only thing missing is custom website blacklist, that would make this add-on PERFECT. Thanks."

Code is easy - I would propably prefer to start from NoScript source but why not take YesScript, modify it and offer your patch to the author. And if he don't accept it in his add-on you can always fork the project and release your enhanced version with slightly different name. It's just simple javascript and there is literally loads of example code to see around here....
Or... Was this plugin released under open source license?

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Open source

YesScript is licensed under GPL3. Patches are welcome.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars

YesScript is so much better than NoScript, and so under appreciated. It makes NO SENSE to block all websites from using JavaScript and to have to manually allow each and every address. It got so bad with NoScript that almost every new website I visited, I was temporarily allowing scripts, which can be dangerous. The worst thing is it would only show part of the web page and sometimes hang on loading others. I only need it to block scripts on a few websites, not the entire Internet. The only thing missing is custom website blacklist, that would make this add-on PERFECT. Thanks.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Rated 5 out of 5 stars

I say "YES" to YesScript! Was looking for a way to keep Yahoo News from stealing focus and putting my cursor in the news search box everytime I clicked on a link. I couldn't scroll the page using the BackToTop extension without clicking on the page first. Dozens of times a day. Also, if I went back a page it wouldn't go to where I had left off - it would jump to the top because the cursor was in the search box.Tried NoScript but soon tired of having to set up a whitelist for every site I wanted Java on when there was only one I needed to block it on. Then found YesScript and it is just what I needed. It makes it so easy to blacklist a site that is giving trouble, and unblacklist it with a click if you need to run java on that site sometimes. Found other sites that load much faster without Java and have blacklisted them to. Super simple extension to set up Java blacklists!!

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Rated 5 out of 5 stars

I say "YES" to YesScript! Was looking for a way to keep Yahoo News from stealing focus and putting my cursor in the news search box everytime I clicked on a link. I couldn't scroll the page using the BackToTop extension without clicking on the page first. Dozens of times a day. Also, if I went back a page it wouldn't go to where I had left off - it would jump to the top because the cursor was in the search box.Tried NoScript but soon tired of having to set up a whitelist for every site I wanted Java on when there was only one I needed to block it on. Then found YesScript and it is just what I needed. It makes it so easy to blacklist a site that is giving trouble, and unblacklist it with a click if you need to run java on that site sometimes. Found other sites that load much faster without Java and have blacklisted them to. Super simple extension to set up Java blacklists!!

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Rated 5 out of 5 stars

I only use this to block Drudge from auto refreshing and to obliterate certain annoyances on other sites that AdBlock Plus won't kill, like that obnoxious bar imploring me to "Join CNET" at the bottom of every page on their site.

NoScript is far more trouble than it's worth; sorry, not that paranoid. I do use it on those rare occasions when I want to go online in my Administrator Account, but for my standard user account this suits me perfectly.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Very nice. Rated 4 out of 5 stars

It is very nie but I think it should have the option to block Java on specific sites instead of whole domains. Sometimes i want no java on a certain page of a site but still want it on others.

The people that say blacklisting is stupid: why do you ever bother getting something that all it does is black list if you know you dislike that?. Why post it on a review if that is not a flaw in the add-on but rather your own flaw?.

I don't like Noscript at all. I find it annoying having to click something to allow me to use a site every time I go to it. Even if I set it to allow all it still blocks some stuff. YesScript is the almost perfect solution.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Rated 1 out of 5 stars

I found this useless. Maybe I didn't know how to use it correctly, but it seem as if I had to type in the URL for each site I wanted to block. It seemed worthless for popups of any type.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Rated 3 out of 5 stars

Thanks for this extension but need to be more extended.

As other users I really regret a pattern feature for url's

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Does it support wild characters ? Rated 1 out of 5 stars

Does it support wild characters ? Apparently no, what a pity. I have to input lots of dynamic domain names manually.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Rated 3 out of 5 stars

Agreed on the URL pattern - the reason I found and installed this add-on is because I'm sick to death of the horrible IntelliTxt / Vibrant Media in-line ads.

However, IntelliTxt craftily have dynamic domains for each site; E.g. "http://mysite.intellitxt.com/"

I'm not paranoid, and I don't mind non-distracting ads - after all, they pay for the sites I love - so I'm not going to go the FlashBlock/AdBlock/NoScript route.

I'll keep using this add-on, blacklisting each site's IntelliTxt host, but I'd love to see at the very least some basic wildcard support, if not full regex.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

no URL patterns possible Rated 2 out of 5 stars

Unfortunately does neither allow asterisks nor regex to define URL patterns. This makes it unfortunately quite useless to me, as it lacks lots of flexibility!
Nice attempt, but too quickly coded (for now). Hopefully will improve!

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Awesome for people who dont use virus ridden operating systems! you'll see a few comments from poor windows users who are terrified about their system getting pwned so they claim everyone should be running noscript; forget that! I only want to block javascript on sites where it annoys me, I have no security concerns. noscript annoys me (i dont want to have to tell it that it's ok to run scripts from umpteen million sites that use js responsibly) so using it becomes a zero sum game

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Rated 4 out of 5 stars

NoScript may be great if you actually want what NoScript offers. YesScript is NOT attempting to cover what NoScript does (and the author clearly explains this).

All I wanted was a lightweight, quick way to disable the annoying scripts on one particular site. That's all, nothing more. YesScript works great for that. My only criticism is that the YesScript icon in the status bar is a little TOO convenient. A dirty mouse (or, more commonly, a stray brush against a laptop touchpad) is all it takes to accidentally blacklist a site. It would be nice to have an option to either disable the icon, or perhaps to add a confirmation prompt before adding a site to the blacklist.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Rated 5 out of 5 stars

I'm not using YesScript on security issues (handled in a system-wide way), but on cosmetic/speed issues, when I encounter a few sites which are really to stubborn with ads, stats and you name it : YesScript is here exactly what I need. I've abandoned NoScript after a few months, far too in my way.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Luddites abound here Rated 1 out of 5 stars

Ghis1964 among others here are clearly luddites!

1st none of the blockers are totally effective since there is XSS issues to be considered which NoScript's developer is actively doing.

2nd, the rule of protection is DENY ALL by default and then allow only that which you need (white listing). So thinking to close the gate after the horse is out is moronic at best (black listing).

Too bad we have not yet gone to needing a license to use a PC yet.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Missing wildcharacter Rated 2 out of 5 stars

It really needs some kind of wildcharacter because for example yahoo mail page can have hundreds of servers (http://us.mc***.mail.yahoo.com) and you would have to block each one by hand. Otherwise it's a brilliant ideea.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Rated 5 out of 5 stars

This is very useful little thing. The only problem is that I usually forget its name, and then have a hard time finding it again on Firefox site... Five stars and a big YES for "Yes Script" :)

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

Rated 3 out of 5 stars

This duplicate's NoScript's blacklist mode. Check off the option in NoScript to allow scripts globally, and it will use a blacklist instead of a whitelist.
It's a little misleading of this product to boast its usefulness because it does something the other product doesn't do by *default*. I find it a lot easier to just change my existing extension into blacklist mode than to uninstall it and install YesScript, which lacks many features of NoScript.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.7). 

subj vs NoScript Rated 3 out of 5 stars

Problem is that some sites uses foreign javascript api or flash, like banners counters etc.
So i think, noscript is better.
About paranoia: remember security holes, that have given us 3.5.1 and 3.5.2. Noscript users just dont mind about that.
But internets are blessing you for another unit in FF-addon galaxy.

This review is for a previous version of the add-on (1.6).